Investigations

The investigation of complaints

How the Standards Commissioner investigates complaints

If the Commissioner for Standards in Public Life decides that a complaint is inadmissible or that he should not investigate it, he will write to the complainant to say why.

If the Commissioner decides to investigate the complaint, he will forward it to the person who is the subject of the complaint and ask that person for his or her reactions. This is in keeping with the requirements of the law and the principles of natural justice.

If you wish to make a complaint but you do not want the subject of your complaint to get to know your identity, please make this clear in your complaint. The Commissioner will decide whether and how to investigate the complaint with this in mind.

Besides seeking the views of the person who is the subject of a complaint, the Standards Commissioner can make such additional inquiries as he considers necessary. By law, the Commissioner can summon witnesses to give evidence and produce documents.

The Commissioner must suspend his investigation if the case he is investigating becomes the subject of legal proceedings, an inquest by the Court of Magistrates, or a police investigation. The Commissioner himself can refer a case to the police (or another authority) if he considers this necessary. In this case too the Commissioner must suspend his investigation, but he is empowered to ask the police for updates about their own investigation and when they expect to conclude it.

Investigations by the Commissioner for Standards in Public Life should normally be concluded within six months. If an investigation goes beyond six months the Commissioner must submit a report explaining the delay to the Speaker of the House of Representatives in his capacity as chairperson of Parliament’s Standing Committee for Standards in Public Life. This procedure must be repeated at further six-month intervals if the investigation is still not concluded.

What happens after an investigation

If the Standards Commissioner finds that a complaint is justified, he can present a case report to Parliament’s Standards Committee. The Commissioner will notify the complainant and the person who has been investigated that he has concluded his investigation and forwarded his case report to the Committee. The Standards Committee will consider the report and decide what further action should be taken.

If, however, it appears to the Commissioner that a breach of ethics is not serious in nature and it can be remedied by the person under investigation, he will propose action by way of a remedy. If that action is carried out, the Commissioner will close the case and present a report to the Standards Committee for information purposes only. The Commissioner will also send copies of the report to the complainant and the person who has been investigated.

Alternatively, if it appears from the Commissioner’s investigation that a criminal offence has been committed, he will refer the case to the police and inform the chairperson of the Committee accordingly.

If the Commissioner finds that a complaint is not justified, he will send his case report to the complainant and the person who has been investigated. He will also send the report to the Standards Committee for information only and the case will be considered closed.

In addition, the Commissioner’s case reports are normally published once cases are closed.

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